Sensor failure led to Soyuz launch failure, says Roscosmos

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Roscosmos has said that a faulty sensor caused the failure and that it believes Soyuz rockets will resume launching in December, when a three-person crew at the International Space Station must return to Earth.

The sensor was damaged during the rocket's assembly at the Baikonur spaceport in Kazakhstan, the probe commission head said.

The Russian rocket that carried two people to space last month failed and sent the craft back to Earth because of "deformation" of a part that was made during assembly at the cosmodrome, a space official said on November 1.

The Soyuz is now the only rocket that is capable of sending humans to the ISS and a launch failure hasn't happened since 1983.

The rocket producer will also take apart two other rockets that have been recently assembled and are due to launch in the coming weeks and then re-assemble them, as they might have the same defect, Skorobogatov said. The Soyuz rocket-spaceship duo has been astronauts' only ride to and from the orbiting lab since NASA grounded its space shuttle fleet in 2011.

Sergei Krikalyov, a senior Roscosmos official, was quoted by state news agency TASS as saying the next manned launch had been planned for mid-December, but that Russian Federation was trying to bring the date forward so that the ISS is not briefly left without a crew.

American Nick Hague, 43, and Russian Aleksey Ovchinin, 47, were recovered in good health from an escape capsule.

The incident occurred on 11th October as has been traced to a malfunction that occurred in the detector that signals separation of the rocket's first and second stages. Both men were fine.

After investigating the incident, Russia's space agency, Roscosmos, determined that one of the rocket's boosters failed and stuck to the main rocket body instead of peeling off.

"It was damaged during the assembling of the strap-on boosters with the core stage at the Baikonur Cosmodrome".

They had initially been scheduled to land on December 13 after their stint on the ISS, a joint project of the space agencies of America, Europe, Russia, Japan and Canada.

In the first official report on the cause of the October 11 accident, Roscosmos said a sensor that indicated the separation of the first two stages of the rocket malfunctioned.

Since then, Nasa has paid Russian Federation for seats on its Soyuz rockets to ferry its astronauts to the station.

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