Foot Spider Web Blankets Entire Lagoon In Greece

Keen to see the ethereal spiderweb in Greece? Here's everything you should do near Aitoliko

Giant spider-web cloaks Greece coast

A spider web spanning almost 1,000ft has appeared in Greece, where locals say unusually high mosquito activity took place before the web appeared.

Spurred into overdrive by an explosion in the populations of insects they eat, thousands of little spiders in the western Greek town have shrouded coastal trees, bushes and low vegetation in thick webs. In 2015, a similar event was reported with Tetragnatha spiders in Dallas, Texas where webbing took over a "football-field" length area.

Residents say the extensive spider webs have another benefit: keeping down mosquitoes.

In short, a giant spider-web of 300 meters long and made by Tetagnatha spiders covers an entire shoreline in Aitoliko, Greece, but unfortunately, the magnificent creation won't last long because, as soon as the spiders mate and lay eggs, they will die.

Scientists say the arachnids are merely enjoying the attractive weather and availability of food, taking the opportunity to "party".

Thankfully, the webs won't be around to menace the people of Aitoliko forever, according to Maria Chatzaki, a professor of molecular biology and genetics at Democritus University in Thrace, Greece.

"When an animal finds abundant food, high temperatures and sufficient humidity, it has the ideal conditions to be able to make large populations", she said.

Fortunately, the spiders shouldn't cause any permanent damage to the area's plants.

Tetragnatha spiders, Live Science reports, are known for their long, ovular bodies, even dubbed as "stretch spiders" because of it.

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