Massive spiderweb blankets Greek beach for spider mating 'party'

A spooky scene of a 300m-long spider web cloaking a scenic seaside in Greece has been attributed to a mass of frisky spiders in the heat.

Although neither the gnats or the spiders are risky to humans, CNN predicts getting rid of the webs will require a lot of dusting.

Reuters reports that giant spiderwebs recently started blanketing the shores of Aitoliko in western Greece.

The video, posted on YouTube by Giannis Giannakopoulos, shows a beach in the town of Aitoliko covered in webs almost 300m long.

Greek local and photographer Giannis Giannakopoulos captured stunning photographs and a video of the webs.

The web was created by Tetragnatha spiders, a type of spider that falls in the long-jawed orb weaver classification.

Although the event takes place every three to five years, an increase in the mosquito population - a staple in the spiders' diets - combined with this summer's hot and humid conditions are believed to have contributed to the extraordinary size of the 2018 webs.

Sadly, the eight-legged architects will soon die off, leaving the web to degrade naturally.

More yummy gnats mean more Tetragnatha spiders, according to Maria Chatzaki, a biology professor at Greece's Democritus University of Thrace.

Though those with phobias may find the sudden presence frightening, experts say these spiders aren't risky to humans and were likely just taking advantage of favorable mating conditions.

Fortunately, the spiders shouldn't cause any permanent damage to the area's plants. "They mate, they reproduce and provide a whole new generation".

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