Authorities open 2,000-year-old sarcophagus, apparently avoid curse

The coffin's discovery at the beginning of July caused a stir

The coffin's discovery at the beginning of July caused a stir

Several historians believe that someday the remains of King Alexander may be discovered on top of the city. It's believe is Alexander the Great who founded the city in 331 B.C. His tomb has never been found.

"The sarcophagus has been opened, but we have not been hit by a curse", said Waziri.

Inside were three skeletons floating in foul-smelling sewage that had leaked into the vessel from the road above through a small crack in the sarcophagus, according to Egypt's Ministry of Antiquities.

Egypt's antiquities ministry had previously dismissed the chances of finding Alexander's remains in the sarcophagus.

Coffin is moved over by a truck after archaeologists unearthed a sarcophagus containing three mummies in Alexandria, Egypt July 19, 2018. According to Dr. Mostafa Waziri, General Secretary of the Supreme Council of Antiquities, the sarcophagus may be the largest ever discovered in Alexandria.

Archaeologists prepare to open the sarcophagus discovered during a construction survey in Alexandria this year.

Mostafa Waziri said cold water was poured over the sarcophagus in a ritual
Mostafa Waziri said cold water was poured over the sarcophagus in a ritual

Shaaban Abdel Amonem, one of the specialists in mummification who attended the opening, said initial assessments showed the trio were probably soldiers, with one of the skulls displaying evidence of arrow blows.

The box itself weight 27 tonnes, and is nearly three metres long, the largest structure of its kind ever found intact.

The skeletons will be removed from that soup and taken to a museum in Alexandria, where they will be examined for clues on how they lived - and died.

"In this regard, he denied the rumors spread by some global newspapers that opening the sarcophagus would unleash the curse that would bring disaster to the world".

Manning, who said the archaeological find "looked like a non-elite burial", has a theory on its origins: that although the sarcophagus appeared to date back to the Ptolemaic Kingdom (305 B.C.to 30 B.C.), it may have been used a couple of times.

"We've opened it and, thank God, the world has not fallen into darkness, said Waziri. That is why I called the Ministry of Antiquties to hurry up and open the sarcophagus as soon as possible, to put an end to such a dream and suggestions", Hawass told Ahram Online.

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