Parkland student: Going to school 'feels like jail'

Pollack said he has so far raised $150,000 for the new park. His goal is $1million to be used to build and maintain the park

Pollack said he has so far raised $150,000 for the new park. His goal is $1million to be used to build and maintain the park

The Sun Sentinel reported that Broward County Public Schools officials were providing the new bags as students returned Monday to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland.

The students faced strict new security measures at the campus, implemented after the February 14 attack by Nikolas Cruz that killed 14 students and three educators. She went on to say, "many students are actually unhappy with the clear backpacks, as they believe that it infringes on their privacy, so they wrote messages on pieces of paper and put it into the clear backpacks".

There's also an increased police presence at the school.

Among the new rules, all students will be required to use clear backpacks, have a student ID be visible on them at all times, and will only be able to enter the school under heavy security through a few entry points, according to CNN.

"Just implement a system that works", junior Kai Koerber told CNN, "Similar to what they do at court houses and the airport!"

Rather than feeling safer, students have taken to social media to mock the beefed-up security.

"It is very hard to balance both convenience/privacy with safety/security; if there is more of one, the other often suffers, but I will do my best to balance the two", Thompson wrote in the memo.

Others shared photos of how they've chosen to decorate their new bags, with many continuing the poignant statements from the March For Our Lives, attaching $1.05 price tags to their backpacks - reflecting how much each Florida student is worth to Republican senator Marco Rubio. "It's not like there was a magical bill that was passed that fixed all the things after the march".

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