Facebook trialling system to combat revenge porn

Facebook suggests users upload nudes to avoid revenge porn

Facebook asks users to upload nudes to fight revenge porn

Facebook is trialing a new way to tackle revenge porn which involves users sending the social network nude pics of themselves. CNBC reports Facebook's anti-revenge porn pilot program is available in the U.S., U.K., and Canada.

During the trial, those anxious about their images being posted as revenge porn have to contact Australia's e-Safety commissioner through an online form, which may then suggest providing them to Facebook.

Image-based abuse (IBA), which is not just limited to porn or revenge, is a growing concern in Australia.

"This partnership gives Australians a unique opportunity to proactively inoculate themselves from future image-based abuse by coming to our portal and reporting tool", said Julie Inman Grant, Australia's eSafety Commissioner, in a statement.

It's done by first contacting the e-safety commissioner or regional equivalent (e-safety commissioner is an Australian position, and this test is being carried out in Australia), after which, you will then be advised to send the photo to yourself.

Revenge porn is increasingly a problem around the world. The organization will then tell you to send the image to yourself on Messenger. Facebook will use their cutting-edge image matching technology to stop those images from being uploaded.

In other words, if an image has been taken down and someone tries to re-post or re-share it on Facebook, Instagram or Messenger, the person will see a pop-up that says the photo violates Facebook's policies, according to Tech Crunch.

"They're not storing the image, they're storing the link and using artificial intelligence and other photo-matching technologies", she told broadcaster ABC.

The idea is that hashed images would be completely anonymous and never seen by anyone during the fingerprinting process, and once processed they would be automatically blocked on all of Facebook's services - Facebook, Messenger, Instagram and so on. If successful the trial will spread to the United States, as well as the U.K. and Canada.

In all, 15 percent report receiving threats to post an explicit image an image of them online, and seven percent have actually had such images circulated digitally. If the same photo is uploaded then it will thwart the same and prevent it from distribution.

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