Google lodges ECJ appeal against €2.4bn fine

Ellington Financial book value stable in August

Google Appeals Record EU Antitrust Fine

The EU fined the internet giant for abusing its dominance in Europe to position its own shopping comparison service at the top of Google search results.

AFP has reported Monday, that Google has launched an appeal against the largest antitrust fine ever given by the European Commission regulator in June, costing a staggering €2.4bn (£2bn or $2.8bn).

While Google has declined to comment on the details of its appeal, the European Commission has said that it will defend its ruling in court.

Google had been given 90 days to stop the favouritism or face a penalty of up to 5% of the average daily turnover of its parent company Alphabet.

The company has submitted plans on how it plans to stop favouring its shopping service and these are now being reviewed by Brussels.

Last week, EU officials said a plan that Google recently filed to comply with European regulations appeared to be a step "in the right direction". The tribunal's press service said Google hadn't asked the court to suspend an European Union order for it to change how it displays shopping-search services before it rules on the challenge.

Intel lost its first appeal, but persisted, and on Wednesday the case was referred back to the court that had rejected it with the instruction to allow Intel to challenge more of the evidence against it.

Regulators are also expected to levy fines in separate investigations into Google's Android mobile-phone software - possibly as soon as next month - and the AdSense advertising service.

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